PIME Legislative Initiatives

Pure Integrity for Michigan Elections (PIME)

Easier to Vote. Harder to Cheat.

PIME’s missionTo help restore election integrity to Michigan elections through a peaceful political process.

Position statement:  PIME is an issue-based, nonpartisan political movement that welcomes all who support election integrity and the US and Michigan Constitutions.

A proposal to amend Michigan laws and/or the Michigan Constitution of 1963. If adopted, these proposals would provide citizens qualified to vote in Michigan with the following rights: To have fair and transparent elections; to have valid and fraud-free absentee ballots; to require Voter ID, residency, citizenship, and clean voter rolls; to verify the authenticity and chain of custody of every ballot; to protect Michigan’s rights under the US Constitution and our legislature’s rights and responsibilities; to guarantee free speech and curtail the power of social media companies to choose whose voices are heard. 

Election integrity reform policy objectives to ensure:

  1. Fair and transparent elections
  2. Valid and fraud-free absentee ballots
  3. Voter ID, residency, citizenship, and clean voter rolls
  4. Authenticity and chain of custody of every ballot
  5. Michigan’s rights under the US Constitution and our legislature’s rights and responsibilities
  6. The guarantee of free speech. Curtailing social media companies from choosing whose voices are heard. Supporting government programs that foster understanding and appreciation for this nation’s dedication to liberty and justice for all. 

1. Fair and Transparent Elections

Fair and transparent elections. Election Day will be one day. No early voting, other than duly submitted absentee ballots that conform to election law described herein.Transparency is essential.

A. All voting, other than approved absentee voting, should be in person.

PIME opposes SB 0300, which limits voting to the second Saturday before Election Day. PIME opposes for the following reasons:

(1) Early voting would provide an early window into voter trends and election outcomes, thereby opening the floodgates to fraudsters, ballot harvesting, and other illegal activities. At a time when studies show 70% of Republicans and 30% of Democrats believe the 2020 election was stolen and election integrity is in doubt, we should not open the doors to more opportunities for fraud.

(2) Having two elections would incur enormous extra expense and risk burning out challengers, inspectors, and clerks.

(3) In the inadvisable event that the legislature decides to ignore these objections and votes to approve SB 300, PIME recommends amending the bills as follows: All votes will be tallied that day. Anyone found tampering with the voting process or results will be subject to a felony, punishable with five years in jail.

B. Fairness

To ensure uniformity and non-discrimination, and to prevent disenfranchising all voters, the state and political subdivisions may not solicit, accept, or use any grants, funds, or donations from private persons for elections operations or administration. No counties are allowed to receive grants and monies from outside groups for get-out-the-vote initiatives, incentives, perks, or any other election purposes.

(1) AMEND SB 0284, SB 0287. No government entities will be allowed to receive financial support to offer incentives or perks for assistance whatsoever. Eliminate  initiatives that target different areas or jurisdictions of the state. Exemplary language: “State and political subdivisions may not solicit, accept, or use any grants, funds, donations or remuneration of any sort from private persons or outside groups for elections operations or administration.” (ND passed HB1256.)

(2) SUPPORT SB 0284. No state or local entity shall accept a gift or money from any state election contractor (Lauwers).

(3) SUPPORT SB 0284. The Secretary of State would need to report to the Legislature the contractors they’re working with for the coming election. 

(4) SUPPORT SB 0287. City and townships will be banned from providing prepaid postage on any absentee voter ballot envelope (Stamas). 

(5) SUPPORT SB 0022, SB 0023, HB 4193: Property tax: millage; millage elections; limit to November elections. Amends secs. 24f & 36 of 1893 PA 206 (MCL 211.24f & 211.36).

C. Amend Law

  1. The top-two, state-level political party organizations will select their precinct workers and provide the names and contact information to clerks in each precinct, including absentee precincts, in advance of each election. Pass as a simple, self-standing bill, a one-word change from may to will in the MICHIGAN ELECTION LAW (EXCERPT), Act 116 of 1954, 168.674. Precinct election inspector; appointment; chairperson; political party membership; challenge; vacancies. Sec. 674.

(a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary and subject to this section, the city and township board of election commissioners, at least 21 days but not more than 40 days before each election, but in no case less than 5 days before the date set for holding schools of instruction, will appoint for each election precinct at least 3 election inspectors and as many more as in its opinion are required for the efficient, speedy, and proper conduct of the election. The board of election commissioners will appoint as election inspectors individuals on the list submitted by a major political party under section 673a who is qualified to serve under section 677. An appointment of an election inspector under this section is void if a properly completed application for that election inspector is not on file in the clerk’s office as prescribed in section 677.

(b) AMEND SB 0294: Election officials will report regarding the appointment of an equal number of election inspectors and challengers as selected by from each major political party in each precinct; require under certain circumstances. Amends sec. 674 of 1954 PA 116 (MCL 168.674).

(c)AMEND SB 0294. The ratio of partisan election inspectors in a local community shall be 1:1 for the political parties (Outman). If the ratio isn’t 1:1 the local clerk needs to submit a report to the Secretary of State to outline steps taken to make it as close to 1:1 as possible

(d) Independent organizations that wish to provide poll challengers should petition for selection for the open positions to be filled by one of the two major parties.

(e) If the parties fail to provide a list of a sufficient number of inspectors, they will be notified with sufficient time to remedy. That failing past a specified deadline, the clerk shall hire candidates who, to the best of the clerk’s judgment, fulfill the legal ratio requirements.

(2) SUPPORT. The number of inspectors and challengers provided will be determined by the number and size of the precincts.

(3) HR 4876 requires election inspectors filing an affidavit to indicate political party affiliation (Rep. Alexander). AMEND TO ADD: The two major state parties will provide lists from which inspectors, workers and volunteers will be selected to work, observe, and challenge all aspects of the election process. If a list is not provided by the political party by a legally deadline, then the provisions 673a and 674 shall apply without exception.

(1) All aspects of election process include but are not limited to the programming of machines; set up; absentee and ballot duplication; curing of absentee, in-person and provisional ballots; testing; training of inspectors and challengers; election day; tabulation; and certification.

(2)Inspectors and challengers/observers will be allowed unfettered access to observe and question everything in the entire election process from polling places to ballot processes—exactly like election officials—other than the actual vote casting of the individual. Upon request a physically present candidate, a political party official, a political committee official, or an authorized designee thereof, must be allowed to observe the duplication and curing of ballots. The observer must be able to observe the duplication/curing of ballots in such a way as to allow the observer to readily see and examine the markings on each ballot and the duplication and curing taking place.

(4)Independent organizations that wish to provide poll challengers should petition for selection for the open positions to be filled by one of the two major parties.

(B) PIME recommends election inspectors should be of voting age, not 16- or 17-year-olds. DELETE: (5) a person an individual who is 16 or 17 years of age may be appointed to a board of election inspectors. Before a person an individual may be appointed under this subsection, the first 3 members of the board are required to be appointed under section 672 must meet the requirements of subsections

(C) DELETE IN (4) ITS ENTIRETY: (4) is attending a K-12 school and if an election falls on a school day, the person shall individual must provide to the clerk, along with the application and affidavit filed under subsections (1) and (2), a written document from his or her school specifically acknowledging that person’s individual’s application for appointment to the board of election inspectors and specifically excusing that person individual from school on the date of service, if the appointment is made.

(4) The only limitation on poll workers is that they are not allowed to interfere with the voting and counting process.

(5) A representative of the election office will be present at all times.

(6) A legal authority who can cite, document, digitally gather, and report election law infractions to the county and state election officials will be present at all polling locations.

(7) LEGISLATE to counter infringements of US HR1 and/or its inevitable successor bills. AMEND: McBroom’s bill stating that poll workers have the right and obligation to report concerns to election official or clerk. Change wording to include: Each poll watcher, observer, and challenger has the right and obligation to report any concerns to the election official or clerk.

(8)The election official or the clerk will promptly answer all Worker questions and address and remedy any Worker-lodged concerns.

(9) AMEND SB 0309: to define “reasonable distance” to mean a distance that allows the election challengers sufficient room for clear readability and unobstructed views of each ballot as it is processed, and the proximity of the challenger will be self-determined by the challenger. Election officials will station observers within comfortable reading distance of three feet or less and with an unobstructed view of in-person and absentee ballot counting, curing, and verification processes.

(10) LEGISLATE. Appoint special prosecutor to ensure lawbreakers will be prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law.

(11) SUPPORT SB 0290 and SB 0291. Only political parties with candidates on the ballot can offer up poll challenger on Election Day and those challengers would need to wear visible ID badges and be properly trained (Outman). 

     AMEND SB 0294. The ratio of partisan election inspectors in a local community shall be 1:1 for the political parties (Outman). If the ratio isn’t 1:1 the local clerk needs to submit a report to the Secretary of State to outline steps taken to make it as close to 1:1 as possibleIndependent organizations that wish to provide poll challengers should petition for selection for the open positions to be filled by one of the two major parties.

12) LEGISLATE. Major state parties to provide Workers for all aspects of election process—during programming of machines, set up, absentee and ballot duplication, curing, testing, training of Workers, Election Day, tabulation, and certification.

AMEND SB 0292, SB 293, SB 0306, HB 4129 & HB 4528 to allow for the major parties to create the training curriculum or make Secretary of State training subject to legislature’s final approval. All training sessions should be video and audio recorded and published online for public review.

(13) SUPPORT: Poll worker/clerk training.. Sec. 33a. (1) Subject to subsection (2), not later than July 1 of each odd numbered year, the secretary of state will post on the department of state website the name of each county, city, and township clerk who is not current with his or her continuing election education training as required under section 33. The secretary of state will immediately remove the name of a county, city, or township clerk whose name is posted on the department of state website as required under this subsection when that county, city, or township clerk provides satisfactory evidence to the secretary of state that he or she is current with his or her continuing election education training as required under section 33.

(a) Not later than June 1 of each odd numbered year, the secretary of state will send notice by mail or electronic mail to each county, city, and township clerk who is not current with his or her continuing election education training as required under section 33. If a county, city, or township clerk who is sent notice under this subsection provides satisfactory evidence to the secretary of state before July 1 of that year that he or she is current with his or her continuing election education training as required under section 33, the secretary of state is not allowed to post the name of that county, city, or township clerk on the department of state website as provided in subsection (1).

(b) AMEND SB 0306. Sen. Victory. Elections; election officials; secretary of state to prepare a report regarding clerks who are not current with training; require, and require secretary of state to post the report on the department of state website.

Prior to the election major state parties shall have an opportunity to provide the lists of pre-approved, trained Workers for all aspects of election process—during programming of machines, set up, absentee and ballot duplication, curing, testing, training of Workers, Election Day, tabulation, and certification. The hire of these party-recommended workers shall be given priority and take precedence over other hires.

The major parties shall have the right to create or to sign off on the training curriculum. Whether the training is created or provided by the two major parties or by the Secretary of State, all training shall be subject to the Legislature’s review and approval. All training sessions shall be video- and audio-recorded and published online for public review. 

(14) SUPPORT and AMEND SB 0293. Repeal criminal penalties. Poll challengers should be unfettered in their responsibility to ensure a free and fair election. Add language:  If a poll inspector for any reason cannot or will not afford a poll challenger the readable distance that the challenger is are allowed by law, the inspector will step down from the inspector’s job(s) and allow a substitute inspector who is willing to abide by the law to take the inspector’s place.

(15) SUPPORT HB 4511. Elected Official’s Name is not allowed to appear on any ballot-related material that is provided to an elector.

(16) LEGISLATE. Michigan shall conduct forensic audit of 2020 election results, using accredited firm(s), in any situation in which a county was out of balance 10% or more.

(17) LEGISLATE to institute forensic audits. Unless we know what went wrong in the 2020 election, we cannot fix elections going forward. Public confidence is eroded. Need to pursue all lawbreakers from 2020 election and pursue to the fullest extent of the law. Enact laws to prevent recurrence. Model: Maricopa County, AZ.

(18) SUPPORT SB 0121. (1) In order to better promote a diversity of perspectives on the state board of education representative of the great diversity of schools, students, and communities across the many regions of this state, it is the intent of the legislature that members of the state board of education be nominated by regions, but still be elected and serve statewide” (McBroom).

(19) SUPPORT HB4530, HB4531, HB4532, HB4533, SB0131, SB0132. Move primary to consolidate August and April Elections to June.

(20) Ballots are to be printed on secure paper.

2. Valid and fraud-free absentee ballots

(A) LEGISLATE. To limit abuse of absentee ballots, no-reason absentee ballot qualifiers will end. Rules for administering absentee ballots will return to pre-COVID-19 status. (Requires Constitutional amendment).

(B)To qualify for use of an absentee ballot, each voter will have to be unable to vote in-person because he or she will be out of town or have a health, age or infirmity reason that prevents them from voting in person on Election Day.

(C) To apply for an absentee ballot, a voter will validate his or her identity and residency with a non-expired state issued ID card or driver’s license or federally issued ID. (MCL addressing Voter Identification: 168.499, 168.499e, 168.500c repealed 12/31/18.)

(D)AMEND HB 4837, which prohibits access to qualified voter file by organizations and nonaccredited election officials. Rep. Sarah Lightner

(1) AMEND VIA [bracketed] LANGUAGE: The secretary of state and each county, city, or township clerk shall not allow an [individual organization], an individual employed by, contracted by, or associated with an organization, or a nonaccredited election official to access the qualified voter file. [The Michigan Department of State will enter into no data sharing agreement with a private entity for the purpose of voter registration. Nor will it establish voter registrations via any application programming interface.]

(2)A designated voter registration agency or a county, city, or township, or village clerk shall not add to, delete from, or change any information contained in the qualified voter file during the period beginning on the seventh day before an election and ending on the day of the election.

(3)The secretary of state shall create an inactive voter file.

(4) If an elector is sent a notice under section 509aa to confirm the elector’s residence information or if an elector does not vote for 6 consecutive years, the secretary of state [shall place the registration record of that elector in the inactive voter file will deem the voter inactive and will purge the registration record of that elector for the inactive voter file The registration record of that elector must remain in the inactive voter file until] until 1 of the following occurs:

(a) [(a) The elector votes at an election.]

(b)(ba) The elector responds to a notice sent under section 509aa.

(c) (cb) Another voter registration transaction involving that elector occurs.

(d) [(7) While the registration record of an elector is in the inactive voter file, the elector remains eligible to vote and his or her name must appear on the precinct voter registration list.

(e) (8) If the registration record of an elector is in the inactive voter file because the elector was sent a notice under section 509aa to confirm the elector’s residence information and that elector votes at an election by absent voter ballot, that absent voter ballot must be marked in the same manner as a challenged ballot as provided in section 727.]

(E) SUPPORT SB 0285. Voters will present a photo ID when submitting an absentee ballot application under Sen. Lana Theis’s bill.

(a) Absentee voter mail ballot signatures will match the most recent signature on file to be counted.

(b) The major political parties and candidates will not be shut out from observing the signature matching process.

(F) AMEND HB 4839. Modify and expand election options on absent voter ballot applications. Allows for absentee voters to vote for all elections that year. Rep. Brad Paquette (R)

(1) An application for an absent voter ballot under this section may be made in any of the following ways:

(a) On an absent voter ballot application form provided for that purpose by the secretary of state.

(b) In addition, the clerk of a city or township may provide, [only upon elector request] an annual absent voter ballot application to an elector that allows an elector to select any or all of the elections to be held in the calendar year.

(c) To apply for an absentee ballot, a voter will validate his or her identity and residency with a non-expired state-issued ID card or driver’s license or federally issued ID. (MCL addressing Voter Identification: 168.499, 168.499e, 168.500c repealed 12/31/18.)

(d) Only the local or county clerk may circulate absent ballot application forms, and the local clerk will send these forms only to a voter who has requested an absentee ballot for that specific election and only that election.

(e) SB 310: The Secretary of State and county clerks shall be prohibited from mailing unsolicited absentee ballot applications or ballots to electors.

(f) Both the application request and voting will require a wet, verified signature.

(g) Absentee voter mail ballot signatures will match the most recent signature on file to be counted.

(h) The major political parties and candidates will be included in observing the signature matching process.

(i) Absentee ballots should be returned only to the locations of the voter’s local offices of the county boards of elections.

(j) Absentee ballots should be returned and received by the clerk by the time polls close on Election Day.

(k) The county and local clerks will alert voters of election process changes.

(G) AMEND SB 0283. Local clerks will be allowed to begin pre-processing absentee ballots between 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on the Monday before the election, provided poll challengers and workers are in place and allowed at all clerks’ offices and all early voting locations (LaSata).

(H) SUPPORT. Eligibility for absentee ballots changes from 60 to 18 years of age.

(I) SUPPORT SB 0310. To eliminate duplicate applications, only the clerk’s office will be allowed to send ballot applications.

(J) SUPPORT. A government-issued ID shall be free for any person who cannot afford one. To obtain an absentee ballot shall require a witness signature and notarization.

(K) LEGISLATE. In order to duplicate and cure absentee ballots, state-level, party-selected observers from the two major parties or state-level political committee officials from both parties will be allowed the opportunity to be present and observe the duplication/curing.

(L) LEGISLATE. A process will be created to use valid absentee ballot cure affidavits to update voter signatures immediately.

(M) AMEND. When the clerk’s office mails an absentee ballot to a voter’s residential address and the post office responds that the ballot is undeliverable, a record will be flagged in the voter registration records and an additional step will be taken to determine the voter’s current residential address (steps like a phone call, email, or personal visit). If, after the additional step, the applicant’s address is not verified, the applicant will be immediately removed from the voter roll and determined to be ineligible to vote until such time as the voter takes steps to renew eligibility.

(N) Post-election notice will be sent to electors whose ballots were invalidated due to a signature discrepancy.

(O) Election officials may mail Absentee Ballots for domestic absentee ballots between 40 and 33 days before an election.

(P) OPPOSE SB 0008, SB 0009, SB 0311. Members of the U.S. military who do not believe they’ll be able to vote in person on Election Day can vote electronically using a Common Access Card (Johnson). SB0009 Electronic online voting for military personnel and their spouses. Do not open the door to online voting with electronic signatures. As evidence, this bill has already expanded to include spouses voting electronically, and they do not have access to the Common Access Card so are not secure.

(Q) SUPPORT SB 0310. The Secretary of State would be banned from sending unsolicited absentee ballot applications (Johnson). The bill does not apply to local clerks. 

(R) SUPPORT HB 4133 and HB 4132. Felonies.

(1) Knowingly filling out an absent voter ballot application and, without consent, submitting or causing to be submitted that absent voter ballot application containing another person’s name and information (168.759(9)) Pub. Trust.

(2) Knowingly filling out and submitting or causing to be submitted an absent voter ballot application with the intent to obtain multiple absent voter ballots for a person. 168.759(10)

(3) Knowingly submitting an absent voter ballot application containing false information or a forged signature (168.759(11).(This chapter applies to the following felonies enumerated in chapter 168 of the Michigan Compiled Laws A bill to amend 1927 PA 175, entitled “The code of criminal procedure,” by amending section 11d of chapter XVII (MCL 777.11d), as amended by 2018 PA 661.)

(S) SUPPORT HB 4135. Absent voter counting boards. The board of election commissioners of a city or township will establish absent voter counting board(s) for election day precincts in accordance with Ballot Sec. 765a. (MCL 168.765a), as amended by 2020 PA 177, subject to section 764d.

AMEND. At least one canvasser from the County Board of Canvassers as selected from a list provided by from each major state political party will need to be present for the canvassing of returns.

(T) AMEND SB 0279. The number of election challengers at an absentee voter counting board will be based on the size of a participating municipality (Johnson). 

MCL Addressing Absentee Voting: 168.13, 168.16, 168.507a, 168.509t, 168.736b-e, 168.758, 168.759, 168.759a, b, 168.763 Repealed 3/28/1956, 168.765, 168.769a Repealed 12/31/18, 168.795, 168.798b, 168.798c, 168.945)

Canvassers will also have an opportunity to review and exercise final approval on the hiring of all assistant clerks. Each poll watcher, observer, inspector, and challenger has the right and obligation to report any concerns to the election official or clerk and will be selected from a list provided by the two major, state-level parties (provided one or the other or both submit their list(s) by the published deadline) and will be present at all times throughout every step in the handling processes of absentee ballots, to include, but not limited to, the arrival of ballots at early voting centers and in the clerk’s office, through the opening and processing and tabulation of results.

(U) SUPPORT SB 0334. Absent voters; pre-processing of absent voter ballots; allow. Amends secs. 24k & 765 of 1954 PA 116 (MCL 168.24k & 168.765). “Not later than 40 days before each August primary election held in an even numbered year, each board of county canvassers will examine the absent voter ballot secrecy envelope containers to be used. Requires timely Sec. of State report. Ruth Johnson

(V) LEGISLATE or AMEND. Each watcher, observer, inspector, and challenger will be selected from a list provided by the two major, state-level parties (provided one or the other or both parties submit their list(s) by the published deadline) and will be present at all times throughout every step in the handling processes of absentee ballots, to include, but not limited to, the arrival of ballots at early voting centers and in the clerk’s office, through the opening and processing.

REQUIRES BALLOT INITIATIVE TO CHANGE: Constitutional Amendment 18-3: The right to obtain an Absentee Ballot without giving a reason.

(W) Absentee ballot request expiration

(1) SUPPORT HB 4839 Absentee ballot applications will expire after one year. Voters who seek to use absentee ballots will resubmit requests for each election cycle.

OPPOSE HB 4134, Rep. Bollin. Elections; other; precinct size; increase, allow precinct consolidation at certain elections, and require clerks to maintain a permanent absent voter list.

PIME strongly opposes the creation of any permanent absent voter list and recommends absent voters must request absent ballots each election cycle for the following reasons:

As Chris Swope of the Michigan Association of Municipal Clerks and the Council of Election Officials stated in his testimony today, Sept. 1, 2021, “There are other situations such as University towns that end up pushing that limit because every year primarily a quarter of the kids move away, and so many of them we don’t get processed out.” 

According to Univstats, “At Michigan colleges, there are 537,083 students including 458,713 undergraduate and 78,370 graduate schools’ students in total for academic year 2020-2021.” (https://www.univstats.com/states/michigan/student-population/)

With approximately 25 percent of the students on the permanent absent voter list becoming ineligible every year, over a four-year election cycle, the permanent absent voter list would gain approximately 537,083 ineligible student voters. 

Further, Michigan’s population declined from 10M to 9.99M with a churn rate of 40 percent of incoming movers and 60% outgoing between 2018 and 2019. (DataUSA, https://datausa.io/profile/geo/michigan/

Therefore, the proposal to keep a permanent absent voter list defies logic. The core issue that needs to be addressed is: How to clean up the voter rolls, especially in regard to high college voter turnover and the churn rate of residents migrating out of the state each year.

OPPOSE: Sec. 658 and 659: Consolidated precincts mustnot exceed 2,999 active registered electors. As Sen. Ruth Johnson articulated so well at today’s hearing, the concern in increasing precinct size is that it could lead to long lines and wait times, thereby discouraging in-person voting. Keeping the precincts small makes it easier to vote in-person. Increasing precinct size would effectively suppress the vote. To stimulate mail-in voting is to increase the risk of fraud. 

CONDITIONAL SUPPORT of Sec. 661. On condition that there is no change to Michigan’s law requiring paper ballots, PIME supports the striking of (1If the election commission of a city, village, or township using voting machines decides to use paper ballots for a primary or election, the preceding limitations shall continue for that election. 

AMEND: Sec. 759e (1)) Each county, city, or township clerk shall maintain a permanent absent voter application list that is good for one election cycle. 

–Voter application for an absentee ballot must be made every election cycle. 

–Only a municipal/city or township clerk is authorized to maintain the absent voter application list. Strikecounty.

–Applications must always made through the township or municipal clerk. Strike county.

–Applications on college campuses must be cross-checked with the student’s home state to remove duplication. US citizenship must be verified.

AMEND 759e(2) 

Strike the request to be put on the permanent single. Replace with absent voter list

–Absent voter must apply in-person or by mail through the US postal service. 

Application must contain a photocopy of a valid state identification and contain a wet signature.

-Electronic signatures must not be used in this process. 

— STRIKE: by facsimile communication, by email, or by first-class mail

AMEND 759e(3): Strike: permanent

OPPOSE 759e(4): Applications should not be sent out without voter request each election cycle.

AMEND 759E(5): Strike: permanent

AMEND 759E(6): Strike this paragraph. (If there no permanent absent voter application list, and electors are required to apply every cycle, it is impossible to have an inactive file.)

AMEND 759E(7): Strike: permanent (three references).

(2) The county and local clerks will notify voters of changes to election processes.

(X) LEGISLATE/AMEND. Absentee ballot security. Ballots awaiting processing will be stored in secured areas according to Election Assistance Commission (EAC)-provided guidance, to include the recommended physical security controls at the local election official’s designated site with tamper-evident seals that have a corresponding log entry, which is audited during processing in order to detect any inappropriate or unauthorized access.

(1) Requests for absentee ballots will enable the local elections official to confirm the requester’s identity, voter registration, citizenship, and registered address. 

(2) Absentee ballots will include an attestation that the voter is the person to whom the absentee ballot was sent, and the voter will not attempt to vote in-person.

(3) Voter rolls provided to physical polling locations will identify which registered voters received an absentee ballot to enable poll workers to inquire about the absentee ballot if the individual appears in-person to vote.

(4) An in-person vote will take precedence over and negate an absentee vote when two ballots from one voter are received.

(5) In order to obtain an absentee ballot, voter will present photo ID at time of absentee ballot request.

(6) Sets the deadline to cure defective absentee ballot signatures to 5:00 p.m. on the day before the election; modifies the ballot-envelope voter’s certificate to request additional contact information; creates additional phone and electronic notice requirements to conform.

(7) The last day a voter may request an absentee ballots will move from 6 to 10 days before an election. Supervisors are prohibited from mailing out such ballots less than eight days prior to the election; allows voter designees to physically pick-up absentee ballots for electors beginning nine days before an election instead of the current five days, to conform.

3. Voter ID, residency, citizenship, and clean voter rolls

(A)To register to vote:

(1) LEGISLATE. Only citizens of the United States and residents of Michigan may vote and be counted one time of the federal, state, county, city and township, village and school elections.

(2) LEGISLATE. Registrant’s citizenship will be verified via Department of Homeland Security database, including access to the E-Verify system. Clerks will have limited, view-only access to federal databases to verify citizenship information.

(3) LEGISLATE. Applicants and registrants who fail verification as citizens will be immediately removed from the qualified voter file (QVF).

(4) LEGISLATE. Registrant will show valid photo identification, proof of US citizenship and residency with a non-expired, state issued photo ID card or driver’s license or federally issued photo ID. (MCL addressing Voter Identification: 168.499, 168.499e, 168.500c repealed 12/31/18.)

(5) LEGISLATE. Registrants will register to vote in person only. Online and mail-in registrations are prohibited. (Requires constitutional amendment.)

(6) LEGISLATE. Wet, verified signatures are required.

(7) LEGISLATE. Registrants will attest to their citizenship. Perjury will be subject to criminal prosecution.

(8) OPPOSE SB 0274. Preregistration is not allowed to be automatic. Preregistration should not be allowed due to the leftist push to eliminate voter ID checks.

Specify that Teenagers 16 to 17 ½ years of age could pre-register to vote when they register for their driver license (Johnson).

(9) SUPPORT SB 0302. Michiganders registering to vote will affirm that they are not registered to vote elsewhere. (LaSata)

US law/Statutory: The National Voter Registration Act (NVRA), widely known as “Motor Voter,” took effect in 1995. Under the NVRA, Michigan must offer voters the opportunity to register to vote through the mail, motor vehicle offices, public assistance agencies. Repeal online registration and other harmful requirements in NVRA via referendum.

(D) B. Voter roll accuracy and hygiene.

(1)LEGISLATE. Computerized statewide voter registration lists will be designed to communicate seamlessly with other state-record and national databases to allow frequent, prompt exchanges and comparisons of information. Sources: Non-Citizen Matching Using the USCIS’s SAVE Database, National Change of Address, Social Security Death Index, and Master Death File Matching.

(2)LEGISLATE. To ensure a clean voter list, an independent commission will be appointed to complete an audit of the qualified voter file (QVF) 30 days prior to every election.

(3)LEGISLATE. The annual audit of qualified voter file will be conducted by a state-certified firm on off-election years.

(4) LEGISLATE. Alternative and varying firms will be contracted to perform the audits.

(5) LEGISLATE. The people who provide the information will be different from those who conduct and balance the audit. 

(6) AMEND SB 0275. Those attending an election audit can record the proceedings with their own cell phones as long as they don’t interfere or disrupt the election audit (Runestad). After the polls closed at 8 p.m., ballot handling can be captured on video.

(7) AMEND SB 0275. Those attending an election audit can record the proceedings with their own cell phones as long as they don’t interfere or disrupt the election audit (Sen. Runestad (R)).

(a) (2), individuals from each political party [may will be allowed to] attend and observe the election audit proceedings and those individuals are authorized to bring their own video recording devices to record the election audit proceedings.

(b) (2) Sections 673a and 674 apply to the appointment of election inspectors to absent voter counting boards under this section [with the exception that the election inspectors must be appointed from a list as provided from the two major political parties. If a list is not provided by the political party by deadline, then the provisions 673a and 674 shall apply without exception.]

(c) Note: Requires change from may to will in the MICHIGAN ELECTION LAW (EXCERPT), Act 116 of 1954, 168.674. Precinct election inspector; appointment; chairperson; political party membership; challenge; vacancies. Sec. 674. The board of election commissioners will may appoint as election inspectors individuals on the list submitted by a major political party under section 673a who is qualified to serve under section 677.

(d) Sec. 801b. (1) For any election involving a statewide office, a legislative office, or a county office, the county, city, or township clerk may [will] provide live video coverage [and audio/video recording(s)] of the custody of all ballots while the ballots are present in the tabulation room of a precinct, absent voter counting board, or combined absent voter counting board. If Llive video coverage [and audio/video recording(s) is provided by a county, city, or township, the live video coverage must be recorded and include date and time indicators. The county, city, or township clerk must make the recording of any live video coverage and audio/video recording(s) available for 40 days [22 months] on the county, city, or township website. In addition, the secretary of state [may will] make the recording of any live video coverage and audio/video recording(s) under this section available on the secretary of state website.

(e) (2) The county, city, or township clerk must retain the recordings of the live video coverage [and audio/video recording] from each precinct, absent voter counting board, and combined absent voter counting board as a public record for 40 days [22 months] after Election Day.

(f) (3) If the feed of the live video coverage under subsection (1) is disrupted or disabled, the county, city, or township clerk is not liable for the disruption, but the clerk must attempt to reinstate the live video coverage as soon as practical. [The county, city, or township clerk is responsible for maintaining at all times a continuous [and audio/video recordings of the custody of all ballots while the ballots are present in the tabulation room of a precinct, absent voter counting board, or combined absent voter counting board.]

(8) AMEND. HB 4837 Prohibits access to qualified voter file by organizations and nonaccredited election officials. Rep. Sarah Lightner (R)

(a) The secretary of state and each county, city, or township clerk shall not allow an [individual organization], an individual employed by, contracted by, or associated with an organization, or a nonaccredited election official to access the qualified voter file. [The Michigan Department of State will enter into no data sharing agreement with a private entity for the purpose of voter registration. Nor will it establish voter registrations via any application programming interface.]

(b) If an elector is sent a notice under section 509aa to confirm the elector’s residence information or if an elector does not vote for 6 consecutive years, the secretary of state [shallplace the registration record of that elector in the inactive voter file will deem the voter inactive and will purge the registration record of that elector for the inactive voter file The registration record of that elector must remain in the inactive voter file until] until 1 of the following occurs:

(c) [(a) The elector votes at an election.]

(d) (ba) The elector responds to a notice sent under section 509aa.

(e) (cb) Another voter registration transaction involving that elector occurs.

(f) [(7) While the registration record of an elector is in the inactive voter file, the elector remains eligible to vote and his or her name must appear on the precinct voter registration list.

(g) [If the registration record of an elector is in the inactive voter file because the elector was sent a notice under section 509aa to confirm the elector’s residence information and that elector votes at an election by absent voter ballot, that absent voter ballot must be marked in the same manner as a challenged ballot as provided in section 727.]

(h) Only the local or county clerk may circulate absent ballot application forms, and the local clerk will send these forms only to a voter who has requested an absentee ballot for that specific election and only that election.

(i) The Secretary of State and county clerks shall be prohibited from mailing unsolicited absentee ballot applications or ballots to electors.

(j) Both the application request and voting will require a wet, verified signature.

(k) Absentee voter mail ballot signatures will match the most recent signature on file to be counted.

(l) The major political parties and candidates will be included in observing the signature matching process.

(m) Absentee ballots should be returned only to the locations of the voter’s local offices of the county boards of elections.

(n) Absentee ballots should be returned and received by the clerk by the time polls close on Election Day.

(o) The county and local clerks will alert voters of election process changes.

(9) AMEND SB 0277. Registrations deemed ineligible will be referred to the state attorney’s office.

County clerks would need to tell the Secretary of State of deaths in their county, so the deceased’s names can be flagged [and removed from] in the Qualified Voter File (Macdonald). 

(10) SUPPORT HB 4491. In accordance with HB 4491, a bill to amend 1954 PA 116, entitled, “Michigan election law,” by amending sections 509o and 510 (MCL 168.509o and 168.510), section 509o as amended by 2018 PA 126. The secretary of state will direct and supervise the establishment and maintenance of a statewide qualified voter file. The secretary of state will establish the technology to implement the qualified voter file. The qualified voter file is the official file for the conduct of all elections held in this state. The secretary of state may direct that all or any part of the city or township voter registration files will be used in conjunction with the qualified voter file at the first state primary and election held after the creation of the qualified voter file.

(11) An individual who appears to vote in person in an election and whose name appears in the qualified voter file for that city, township, or school district is considered a registered voter of that city, township, or school district under this act. SB 277

(12) LEGISLATE. The secretary of state, a designated voter registration agency, or a county, city, or township clerk are not allowed to place a name of an individual into the qualified voter file unless that individual signs an application as prescribed in section 509r(3). The secretary of state or a designated voter registration agency is not allowed to permit an individual to indicate a different address than the address in either the secretary of state’s or designated voter registration agency’s files to be placed in the qualified voter file.

      SUPPORT SB 0282. Only the Secretary of State, a designated voter registration agency, or local clerk is allowed access to the Qualified Voter File (Barrett).

(13) LEGISLATE or AMEND. The secretary of state will develop and utilize a process by which information obtained through the United States Social Security Administration’s death master file, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services vital records database that is used to cancel an operator’s or chauffeur’s license issued under the Michigan vehicle code, 1949 PA 300, MCL 257.1 to 257.923, or an official state personal identification card issued under 1972 PA 222, MCL 28.291 to 28.300, of a deceased resident of this state is also used at least once a month to update the qualified voter file to cancel immediately the voter registration of any elector determined to be deceased. The secretary of state will make the canceled voter registration information under this subsection available to the clerk of each county, city, or township to assist with the clerk’s obligations under section 510.

The secretary of state will monitor state records or arranged notification by said records of any person incarcerated and will immediately remove that person from the voter rolls.

(14) SUPPORT SB 0281. Subject to this subsection, the secretary of state will participate with other states in 1 or more recognized multistate programs or services, if available, to assist in the verification of the current residence and voter registration status of electors.

The Secretary of State will need to work through multi-state programs every year to verify that the voters on the Qualified Voter File still live in Michigan (Lasata). The department would also need to post numbers on how people who changed their residences had duplicate voter registration records and recently died. 

(15) SUPPORT. Sec. 510. At least once a month, each county clerk will forward a list of the last known address and birth date of all individuals over 18 16 years of age who have died in the county to the clerk of each city or township in the county. The city or township clerk will compare this list with the voter registration records and cancel the voter registration of all deceased electors. In addition, each county clerk is authorized to use this list to update the qualified voter file to cancel the voter registration of all deceased electors in his or her county. SB 277

(C) Votes from non-citizens or nonresidents will be invalidated.

(D) RECOMMEND CONSTITUTIONAL BALLOT INITIATIVE to eliminate 2018- Proposition 3 provision for automatic voter registration when conducting Driver’s License or Personal ID with SOS or extension offices.

(1) Automatic registrations lead to multiple registrations by the same individual and the registration of ineligible individuals, such as noncitizens. States should comply with the National Voter Registration Act and provide registration opportunities at state agencies.

(2) All individuals should be asked at the time of the state agency transaction, such as the application for a driver’s license, whether they would like to register to vote. (REPEAL 18-3)

(3) Those who would like to register to vote will be required to attest to their citizenship.

(4) LEGISLATE When a Michigan resident changes the residence address on his or her driver’s license, that information will be sent immediately to state election officials, so the voter registration address of the individual will change to the voter’s new Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) residence address.

(5) LEGISLATE. When an individual has moved into Michigan, individuals will be asked to surrender their driver’s licenses from the originating state. Whether they surrender the license or not will be logged, and the Secretary of State will notify the originating state of the change, so the other state can delete the registrant from that state’s list.

(6) Upon notification from ERIC (Electronic Registration Information Center) that a Michigan resident has requested a driver’s license with a non-Michigan address, the secretary of state shall immediately remove that person’s name from the Qualified Voter File. The Secretary of State will request that other states that do not participate in ERIC to notify its office when a Michigan resident requests a driver’s license with a non-Michigan address. Upon notification, the Secretary of State will delete the registrant from that state’s qualified voter file and notify the county clerks of the deletion. SB 277

Constitutional Amendment 18-3: Automatic voter registration when conducting a Driver’s License or Personal ID transaction with the Secretary of State.

(E) To eliminate same-day registration for voting.

(1) Citizens may register to vote up to 30 days before Election Day in order for election officials to have sufficient time to verify the accuracy of the registration information contained on a registration form and to confirm the eligibility of the potential voter.

(2) Voters will vote in the precinct in which they are registered.

(3) The clerk may direct voters who arrive at the incorrect precinct to the precinct in which the voter is registered.

Constitutional Amendment 18-3: The right to register to vote and obtain a ballot up to and including on election day.

(A) SUPPORT HB 4127. Placeholder date of birth on the qualified voter file: For each registered elector who has been assigned a placeholder date of birth on the qualified voter file because the actual date of birth of the registered elector is unknown, the secretary of state will send by forwardable mail both of the following to the elector:

(1) A preaddressed return card on which the elector may verify his or her date of birth will be completed and returned to the secretary of state at least 15 days before the next election.

(2) If the individual does not return the card, that individual will be required to affirm the date of birth at the polls before being permitted to vote. To keep status as a registered voter, the individual will respond to this notice, vote, or engage in voting-related activity, including, but not limited to, requesting an absent voter ballot application or updating voter registration, by the first business day after the second general November election that is held after the date on this notice.

(3) If a notice sent under subsection (2) is returned to the secretary of state by the post office as undeliverable, the secretary of state will identify the registration record of that elector as challenged as provided in this act. If the elector does not vote or engage in voting-related activity by the first business day after the second general November election that is held after the date on the notice, the secretary of state will cancel the registration of that elector and notify the appropriate city or township clerk of the cancellation.

(B) AMEND HB 4128. Each registered elector who has not voted since the 2000 general November election.For each registered elector who has not voted since the 2000 general November election, the secretary of state is required, not later than 90 days after the effective date of the amendatory act that added this subsection, to send by forwardable mail both of the following to the elector:

(1) A preaddressed return card to the appropriate city or township clerk on which the elector may verify his or her current address information and on which the elector will sign his or her name.

(2) A notice that the secretary of state records indicate the individual has not voted since the 2000 general November election. To confirm status as a registered voter the individual will complete, sign, and return the enclosed card providing the individual’s current address to the appropriate city or township clerk at least 15 days before the next election. If not completed, signed, and returned to the appropriate city or township clerk at least 15 days before the next election, the individual will be required to affirm the individual’s current address at the polls and provide current, valid photo ID before being permitted to vote. To keep status as a registered voter, the individual will respond to this notice, vote, or engage in voting-related activity, including, but not limited to, requesting an absent voter ballot application or updating the voter registration by the first business day after the second general November election that is held after the date on this notice.

(3) Upon receipt of a return card under subsection(2) from an elector, the appropriate city or township clerk will compare the signature on the return card to the signature for that elector on the qualified voter file. If the signature on the return card and the signature for that elector on the qualified voter file do not match, the city or township clerk will identify the registration record of that elector as challenged as provided in this act. The city or township clerk will notify the elector that his or her signature on the return card did not match the signature for that elector on the qualified voter file and that his or her registration record is considered challenged. The notice to the elector under this subsection will include the steps the elector will take in order to no longer have his or her registration record considered to be challenged.

(4) AMEND: If a notice sent under subsection (2) is returned to the secretary of state by the post office as undeliverable, the secretary of state will identify the registration record of that elector as challenged as provided in this act. If the elector does not vote or engage in voting-related activity by the first business day after the second general November election that is held after the date on the notice, the secretary of state will cancel the registration of that elector and notify the appropriate city or township clerk of the cancellation.

4. Authenticity and chain of custody for every ballot

(A) LEGISLATE. Universal signature matching and verification will apply to all ballots. The Secretary of State will create a process to update voter signatures immediately to achieve a 90 percent accuracy level on all ballot envelopes and voter verification apps.

(B)LEGISLATE. All ballots shall bear a governmentally secure watermark.

(C) LEGISLATE. All quick response (QR) codes, bar codes, or otherwise computer-interpretable symbols, marks, or imprints will be removed from all ballots and voter assisted terminals (VATs).

(1)Any ballot containing a quick response (QR) code, bar code, or otherwise computer-readable symbol, mark, or imprint (visible or invisible to the human eye) will be rendered null and void and invalid.

(2) All quick response (QR) codes, bar codes, or otherwise computer-interpretable symbols, marks, or imprints will be removed from all ballots and voter assisted terminals (VATs).

(D)AMEND SB 0295 and SB 0053. Local precinct inspectors will conduct hourly balancing checks at their precincts to make sure the number of ballots issued is the same as the number of ballots that run through the ballot tabulator (Victory).

(1) Off-balance vote counts will undergo a hand recount.

(2) At the end of Election Day, if one precinct in the county fails to balance by more than 5% in a federal, state, or county election, then a state-certified firm (Qualifications to be defined by the legislature) will conduct a countywide forensic audit, to include, but not limited to, review of paper ballots with observers and inspectors from both major parties within readable proximity.

(3) Thereafter, for the next two election cycles, the administration of the off-balance county will transfer to an independent, bipartisan election commission.

(4) The independent, bipartisan election commission will be composed in equal parts of two representatives selected by each of the two major parties.

(E) AMEND SB 0053. DELETE (c) A tabulation of the ballots on a computer using the same software application used in the precinct on election day.

(D) LEGISLATE. All ballot harvesting or vote trafficking is prohibited. No political group will offer to pick up ballots and bring them to the polling place and/or mail them with no third party supervising that group’s behavior in the interim.

(1) Any elections official or citizen who suspects ballot harvesting will immediately report their suspicions to the clerk, and the clerk will follow up.

(2) Third parties, including candidates, campaign staffers, party activists, and political consultants, are prohibited from picking up and potentially mishandling or changing absentee ballots and pressuring or coercing vulnerable voters.

(3) With limited exceptions for immediate family members and caregivers, no one is allowed to return more than one ballot to the clerk’s office or deposit more than one ballot.

(4) The absentee ballot voter will show a current (not expired) Voter ID.

(5) LEGLISLATE: Eliminate drop-off boxes unless they are within the clerk’s office. They cannot be secured. If however, the Legislature decides to have drop boxes, the following rules should apply:

(a) OPPOSE SB 0273, SB 0278, SB 0286. (MCL Pertaining to drop boxes: 168.761d, 168.764a). Absentee voter ballot drop boxes must be approved by the Secretary of State and the Board of State Canvassers, under Johnson’s SB 0273. AMEND: The boxes also must be in a well-lit area and kept under video surveillance inside the office of the clerk. Also, only the local clerk or a deputy clerk can retrieve ballots from the box and a “chain of custody” log must be completed. 

(b) Ballots collected from an absentee voter drop box will need to be delivered immediately to city or township clerk’s office under MacDonald’s SB 0278. 

(c) Voters will not be able to use an absentee voter ballot drop box after 5 p.m. the day before Election Day or on Election Day (McBroom) SB 0286. 

(d) Secure drop boxes shall be placed only inside the main office of the supervisor, at each branch office of the supervisor, and inside each early voting site.

(e) A supervisor shall designate each drop box site at least 30 days before an election. After a drop box location has been designated, it may not be moved or changed. On each day of early voting, all drop boxes must be emptied at the end of early voting hours and all ballots retrieved from the drop boxes must be returned to the supervisor’s office. Employees of the supervisor must comply with procedures for the chain of custody of ballots.

(f) If any drop box at an early voting site is left accessible for the return of ballots outside of early voting hours the supervisor is subject to a civil penalty of $25,000. The election bureau is authorized to enforce the provision.

(6) LEGLISLATE: Require the person dropping off the ballot to provide a current (not expired) Voter ID and to sign under oath that they are directly related to or live with the person whose ballot they are submitting.

(7) LEGLISLATE: The person accepting the ballot is allowed to verify the signature of the voter and third party.

(8) LEGLISLATE: Require the third-party dropping off the ballot to identify themselves, provide signature verification via legal ID, and attest to their relationship to the voter on the qualified voter file (QVF).

(9) LEGLISLATE: Enforce felony, criminal penalties and prosecute illegal ballot handlers.

(10) LEGLISLATE: The clerk will reject unverified relationships to the ballot and return the uncounted ballot to the voter.

(11) To provide voting assistance. Any individuals providing assistance to a voter in a voting booth because the voter is illiterate, disabled, or otherwise requires assistance will be required to complete a form, to be filed with poll election officials, providing the assistor’s name, address, contact information, and the reason they are providing assistance. The assistor will be required to provide a photo ID.

(E) SUPPORT HB4492. Before a building that is not publicly owned or controlled is designated as a polling place by a city or township, the clerk of the city or township in which that building is located will obtain a signed affidavit from the owner or manager of the building that certifies that the owner of the building is not a person that is a sponsor of a political committee or independent committee. (Bollin)

(F) LEGISLATE. To prohibit early vote counting. 

(1) The counting of ballots, including absentee and early votes, will not begin until the polls close at the end of Election Day and will continue without interruption until all valid ballots are counted.

(2) OPPOSE SB 0300 and SB 0301. Early voting would be available between 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the second Saturday before Election Day (Schmidt). PIME OPPOSES EARLY VOTING. AMEND: Those votes will be tallied that day and the public will be given the results of the votes cast. Anyone found tampering with the results will be subject to a five-year felony. 

(G) LEGISLATE. Release of voter or election information

(1) No announcement, exit poll numbers or reporting as to speculated results will be made regarding voter engagement or election results until all the polls close from all states.

(2) No state results will be allowed to be announced or called by the media until all the states’ polls have closed from all states and all election results are received and all data is compiled and the total result is published.

(3) The state will prohibit political parties from acquiring any names or lists of people who have or have not returned their absentee ballots or voted in person until all ballots have been counted within the State.

(H) LEGISLATE. Ballot and election security 

(1) State-legislated, minimum security standards will ensure and protect the chain of custody, the transport, and the security of all ballots.

(2) Video surveillance cameras will record and stream online all activity, other than inside restrooms. The streamed data will include time codes and frame counts encoded from all cameras in real time, including images of all anonymized ballots. 

(3) AMEND HB 4840. Extend, and provide for a record retention period for electronic poll book software record retention period for election ballots. Rep. Borton.

(a) Sec. 847. (1) The secretary of state may authorize the release of all ballots, ballot boxes, voting machines, and equipment after 30 days [22 months] following certification of an election by the board of state canvassers in a precinct other than a precinct in which 1 or more of the following occur:

(J) Election Process 

(1) AMEND SB 0308 and HR 4845. Legislators will revise the signature verification process to the accuracy level of 90%. Consider adding the use of signature verification software.

(2) SB 0303 AMEND to use the term photo identification.

(3) SUPPORT SB 0308 and HB 4845. All local clerks and precinct inspectors will go through signature verification training, so they can better evaluate absentee ballot submissions (Sen. Daley and Rep. Farrington). 

(4) REJECT. Voting Systems/disability voting. Mandates that a voter with a disability cast a ballot on voting systems that produce a voter verifiable paper output (VVPO) for canvassing and recounting purposes. REJECT: Authorizes the general use of such VVPO touchscreen systems by all voters, not just those with disabilities.

(5) Voting Systems/sorting and counting ballots. Prohibits voting systems that cannot simultaneously count and sort ballot overvotes and undervotes in multiple races.

(6) SUPPORT. Primary Election Day. Moves the primary election back from 10 to 11 weeks before the general election in order to allow more time for overseas general election ballots.

(7) SUPPORT. Ballots/sample ballot publication. Allows an election supervisor to forego publication of a sample ballot in a newspaper of general circulation if the supervisor e-mails or mails every registered voter a sample ballot at least seven days before an election.

(8) SUPPORT. Election Contests. Authorizes the courts to review the validity of voter signatures in election contests, to consider the signature on absentee/provisional ballot voter certificates and cure affidavits, and voter IDs submitted therewith.

(9) AMEND SB 0304. Anyone who casts a provisional ballot has six days prior to the election to prove to the local clerk they are who they say they are or else their vote is not counted (Vanderwall). Also, those with limited means can obtain a free state ID card under the bill. 

(1) Sec. 813. (1) …by the elector using current, legal photo identification for election purposes, along with a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check, or other government document to establish the voter’s current residence address if the identification for election purposes used by the elector does not contain the voter’s current residence address

(2) If a person is at the wrong polling place and refuses to go to the correct polling place, that person should not be allowed to vote.

(10) SUPPORT. Polls/no-solicitation zone. Expands the no-solicitation zone around polling places/rooms and early voting sites from 100 feet to 150 feet; prohibits the owners or operators of property on which supervisors site polling places or early voting locations from restricting solicitation beyond the 150-foot zone.

(11) SUPPORT HB 4510. Polls/photographs. Allows a voter to photograph his or her ballot in a polling place.

(12) SUPPORT. Ballot Design/uniformity. Provides ballot uniformity, requiring ballot instructions either be centered across the top of the ballot or in the leftmost column as long as there are no individual races below the column instructions, in most cases. All vote targets will be ovals.

(13) LEGISLATE. Mandates measures to make County Canvassing Board personnel more readily identifiable by requiring large, closed-caption camera readable, I.D. badges on both sides of their persons.

(14) AMEND SB 0296. County Boards of Canvassers would go from a four-member body to a six-member body for counties between 200,000 and 750,000 and to an eight-member body for counties 750,000 and above. (McBroom). Add wording: State parties will be allowed, by a specified deadline, the opportunity to select the canvassers to represent their parties.

(15) AMEND SB 0297. At least one County Board of Canvassers as provided by from each major state political party would need to be present for the canvassing of returns. Insert definition of quorum from SB 296:

(a) [Any 3 members constitute a quorum, but no action becomes effective unless 1 member from each political party represented concurs in the action. Any For a 4-member board of county canvassers, any 3 members constitute a quorum, but no action becomes effective unless 1 member from each political party represented concurs in the action. For a 6-member board of county canvassers, any 4 members constitute a quorum, but no action becomes effective unless 2 members from each political party represented concur in the action. For an 8-member board of county canvassers, any 5 members constitute a quorum, but no action becomes effective unless 2 members from each political party represented concur in the action.]

(16) SUPPORT. Election Code Violations/supervisors. Prohibits a supervisor from receiving a special qualification salary for a period of 24 months after being found to have willfully violated the Michigan Election Code.

(17) LEGISLATE. Disputed ballots will be posted on county supervisor websites.

(18) SUPPORT HB 4510. Ballot rejection. Except as otherwise provided in subsection (3), an elector who shows his or her ballot or absent voter ballot or any part of the ballot or absent voter ballot to any individual other than an individual lawfully assisting him or her in the preparation of the ballot or absent voter ballot or a minor child accompanying that elector in the booth or voting compartment under section 736a, after the ballot or absent voter ballot has been marked, to disclose any part of the face of the ballot or absent voter ballot, the ballot or absent voter ballot is not allowed to be deposited in the ballot box, but will be marked “rejected for exposure” and will be disposed of as are other rejected ballots.

(19) AMEND SB 0276 “An election challenger or poll watcher is authorized, only when votes are being tabulated, to use a camera or video camera, including, but not limited to, a cellular telephone camera, to photograph or videotape, or both, the tabulating of votes at that precinct, absent voter counting board, or other location”

(a) Sec. 801a. (1) Subject to subsection (2), at any precinct, absent voter counting board, or other location where votes are [received, stored, transported,] tabulated for an election, an election inspector, election challenger, or poll watcher is authorized, [only when anywhere] votes are [present, including] being tabulated, to use a camera or video camera, including, but not limited to, a cellular telephone camera, to photograph or videotape, or both, the tabulating of votes at that precinct, absent voter counting board, or other location.

(20) SUPPORT SB 298. Extend election officials; deadline for certificate of determination by board of county canvassers. Sen. McBroom.

(21) SUPPORT SB 299. Extend the deadline for reporting of election results. Sen. Zorn.

(K) Voting machine and software infrastructure

(1) AMEND HB 4838. Provides for prohibiting connection of the electronic voting system, and electronic poll book, [voting machines, or tabulators] to the internet intranets, virtual private networks or any form of electronic communication on election day (Rep. Green).

(2) 4) In each election precinct on election day, the electronic poll book must not be connected to the internet,[intranet, virtual private networks, or to any form of electronic communication [after the polls open and until the results have been tabulated for that precinct.

(3) (o) Not be connected to or operated on the internet, [intranet, virtual private networks, or to any form of electronic communication] until after results have been tabulated and only for the purpose of uploading those results to the appropriate clerk.

(4) No voting terminals or tabulating systems will connect to the internet, intranets, virtual private networks, or any form of electronic communication.

(5) Each tabulator machine will mark each ballot that it counts with a machine-readable mark indicating that ballot has been counted. In this way, ballots will be prevented from being counted more than once. The machine will be programmed not to recount any ballots bearing such mark.

(6) In the event that a machine recount becomes necessary, the machine will contain a toggle switch or coded key that enables it to read previously counted/marked ballots. During recounting, the machine will then mark each ballot with a second, distinguishing mark to indicate the ballot was recounted.

(7) All Dominion, Smartmatic, ES&S, and Hart vote machines and all software sharing the same or similar source code as used in any of these systems will be removed. All tabulators or voting machines, all software from, related to, or sharing components or software code as Dominion and Smartmatic will be removed. The prior systems will be returned or new systems bought or leased to replace them, such as the MIT computer science-department or the State of Texas recommends.

(8) In addition to securing the voting machines, the US Election Assistance Commission (EAC) will inspect and certify the underlying infrastructure of voting machine manufacturers, state election infrastructure, and the supply chain security of the voting machines.

(9) The EAC’s authority will expand to include not only the voting systems that are submitted for voluntary certification but also the full spectrum of vendor products and services in the vote system supply chain, to include components sourced for noncertified products and services.

(10) Michigan voting machines will use and contain only US-made, certified tamper-proof, and inspected hardware and software to include programming code, surface mounts, capacitors, resistors, inductors, and other devices. No products are allowed to be sourced from Communist China-based or Communist China-owned manufacturers or countries deemed unfriendly to the US, including but not limited to Iran and Russia.

(11) Vendors will report breaches, screen employees’ backgrounds, patch security flaws, report foreign ownership or control, and ensure the physical security of sensitive software and hardware.

(12) Supply chain audits will be performed by certified and state-approved IT professionals to determine if organizations in the supply chain have implemented information security governance programs and compensating controls to reduce risks to acceptable levels.

(13) Breaches of chain of custody or any of the regulations above will result in an automatic hand count, forensic audit, or revote.

(14) BBVE uses proprietary, non-public software and hardware designs, and according to a study by Princeton University, is susceptible to undetected hacking and manipulation. The use of all black box voting equipment should be prohibited.

(15) The alternative is to mandate that all election equipment use open-source software and design that is available for inspection and review by the public and technology organizations to ensure the validity and accuracy of vote counting. 

(16) Dumb tabulator machines, open-source election software and hardware, and paper ballots will remove the potential for tampering as well as the suspicion of tampering. 

(17) 12) All election data and the processing of election data should be prohibited from leaving the boundaries of the US. 

(18) Voting precincts will report the total number of in-person and absentee ballots received one hour after polls close to identify the total universe of votes to be counted in the election.

(19) All eligible ballots will be counted and reported within 24 hours after the polls close on Election Day to promote certainty in the outcome of an election.

(20) Counties with the largest number of registered voters will report their final and certified election results before other, smaller counties submit their final election results.

(21) Communication between these counties or other election officials is prohibited prior to the canvassing of the last county. 

(22) AMEND SB 0288. The Secretary of State’s auditing of the election results in a specific precinct will be live streamed and include election inspectors from each political party (Bumstead). 

(a) Not less than 5 days before the date of an election audit under this section, the appropriate city or township board of election commissioners where each precinct to be audited is located must appoint 2 election inspectors, 1 from each major political party, [and approved by their respective political parties] for the efficient, speedy, and proper conduct of the election audit. The board of election commissioners must appoint the election inspectors as provided in section 674 [with the exception that the election inspectors must be appointed from a list as provided from the two major political parties. If a list is not provided by the political party by deadline, then the provisions 673a and 674 shall apply without exception.]

(L) LEGISLATE. To report election results in a timely, accurate and influence-free manner 

(1) Voting precincts will report the total number of in-person and absentee ballots received one hour after polls close to identify the total universe of votes to be counted in the election.

(2) All eligible ballots will be counted and reported within 24 hours after polls close on Election Day to promote certainty in the outcome of an election.

(3) Counties with the largest number of registered voters will report their final and certified election results before other, smaller counties submit their final election results.

(4) Communication between these counties or other election officials is prohibited prior to the canvassing of the last county. 

5. Michigan’s rights under the US Constitution, and the Michigan legislature’s rights and responsibilities

(A) State Legislature will enforce its right and obligation to preserve and protect State election laws.

(1) Article 1 of the US Constitution protects the rights of the State legislatures. Therefore, the Michigan State Legislature (Legislature) alone has the obligation and right to determine all election laws within the State.

The U.S. Constitution, Article I, Section 4, Clause 1 states, “The Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations, except as to the Places of chusing [sic] Senators.”

According to Supreme Court decision Oregon v. Mitchell (400 U.S. 112 (1970)), “Congress may not, however, under this clause, provide different qualifications for electors than those provided by the states.”

(2) AMEND SB 0289: The Legislature has no obligation to adhere to any federal election law or mandates that infringe on the constitutional authority of the Legislature to determine election laws and practices.

If this state or a state agency receives or is eligible to receive federal funds that will be used for election-related purposes, and the federal funds may be received or expended only after satisfying certain conditions placed by the federal government, the federal funds are forbidden from expending except upon appropriation in a budget act. If the federal funds described in this subsection are not appropriated in a budget act within 90 days after the state or state agency receives the federal funds, the federal funds will be returned to the federal government.

(a) The Legislature is prohibited from adhering to any Federal law that the Legislature finds reprehensible.

(b) The Legislature will sue bureaucrats, state, or federal officials for attempts at or attempted execution of unauthorized changes to state election laws.

(c) The Ninth and Tenth amendments to the US Constitution give states the powers not specifically granted to the federal government. While the Ninth guarantees state’s rights, the Tenth disallows future federal interference in state law. Therefore, states have the power to counter the interference by the federal government in the following areas: a president’s executive orders, education, suppression and/or cancellation of free speech, and election law.

(d) State will have access to federal courts when challenging any federal attempt at interference with voter law as constitutionally protected.

(B) LEGISLATE. Redistricting.Only state-level party organizations are allowed to select the nominees and representatives for their party on the independent redistricting commission.

(C) LEGISLATE. State certification of electors

(1) The US Constitution gives Legislatures alone the right to certify Presidential electors. Therefore, no federal, state, or local law is allowed to interfere with the Legislature’s constitutional prerogative to post-election certification of the Presidential electors. 

(2) Any sections of federal and local law that interfere with the Legislature’s constitutional prerogative to manage the election process or post-election certification of the state’s Presidential electors is null and void.

(3) The Legislature will meet, at its discretion, in a joint session to vote to certify its electors, and until such meeting, no Presidential electors will be certified or sent to the US Vice President and Congress to be counted.

(4) Under penalty of felony, impeachment, and removal from office, no state governor, secretary of state, or governmental agency is permitted to attempt to violate the Legislature’s constitutional right to post-election certification of Presidential electors.

(5) Neither state law, the governor, or any non-legislative body or person is permitted to prohibit the Legislature from performing its constitutional responsibilities. Nor are they permitted to attempt to prevent the Legislature from meeting as a body to review, investigate and debate the method in which the election was conducted.

(6) LEGISLATE. Nor is a federal, state, or local law, order or code allowed to exercise a constitutionally non-delegable legislative responsibility or to attempt to make such legislative responsibilities a ministerial process.

(7) LEGISLATE. Any law or code that abridges or conflicts with the Legislature’s responsibility to determine election law and certify electors is null and void.

(8) LEGISLATE. A joint committee will be created to examine federal laws and executive orders to determine if they violate the U.S. Constitution. Violations will be reported to the Legislature, which by majority vote, may nullify federal orders within the State.

(D) Open and fair candidate exposure and disclosures in advertising

(1) Political advertisements, independent expenditures, and electioneering communications sent by text message or postal mail to voters will carry a sponsorship disclaimer.

(2) Sixty days prior to election equal amounts of time, per day, will be allotted for all candidates on public TV and radio. One hour a day would give 30 candidates two minutes each day to make their cases. Run it in same time slot, e.g. 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

LEGISLATE. Regulate dark money

(1) All monies and gifts to a campaign will be disclosed.

(2) No foreign monies, sent directly or indirectly, are allowed to inure to the benefit of a campaign.

(3) No donated monies will be used to pay the candidates or used for the personal benefit of the candidates.

(F) Federal Election Commission.

(1) Neither is Congress allowed to appoint a commission that would advocate for US congressional representation and presidential votes.

(2) LEGISLATE. State election laws and Legislatures are under no obligation to implement any recommendations from a “National Commission to Protect United States Democratic Institutions” or any named federal group designed to study elections and make recommendations for improving elections.

(G)LEGISLATE. Michigan opposes making Puerto Rico or DC states.

(1) LEGISLATE. Prosecution. Violation of any of the election rules stated above will generate an automatic referral for and prosecution of violators.

(2) SUPPORT HCR 5. To reaffirm states’ rights under the US Constitution to establish election laws. Rep. Damoose. While HCR 5 lacks the teeth of a constitutional amendment or a bill enacted into law, it represents a logical first step toward a Constitutional Amendment to protect Michigan residents’ right to a free and fair, state-governed election process. (See Written Statement House Hearing 5_18_2021)

6. The guarantee of free speech. Curtailing social media companies from choosing whose voices are heard. Supporting government programs that foster understanding and appreciation for this nation’s dedication to liberty and justice for all.

Although fake news and disinformation presents a number of threats to the republic, it is protected by the First Amendment. In the end, the responsibility to make informed, fact-based decisions falls on voters. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas argued that companies like Facebook, Twitter, and Google have too much power to kick people off their services or make their content harder to find. To fix that, he said that legislators will soon “have no choice” but to pass new laws that curtail the power of social media companies to choose whose voices are heard. Source: Forbes

(A) LEGISLATE. Big Tech monopolies and social media companies will be regulated like “common carrier” telecommunications services and public utilities. They will be required to host user posts regardless of what those posts say, much like phone companies host all telephone calls despite their content.

(1)Social media will immediately cease and desist censoring and/or de-platforming users Protected under the First Amendment.

(b) Social media will be limited to curtailing and removing only those posts that are not protected under the First Amendment, namely child pornography or incitement to commit illegal acts.

(c) Violators will be subject to $100,000 fine per incident per day (Florida model).

(B) LEGISLATE or AMEND. In the event that the Voting Rights Act is restored, the State will not be subject to approval from the federal government before implementing any voting rules changes.

(1) Election officials and individual citizens are protected in their rights to challenge voter rolls, voter registrations or procedures, or election procedures and will not be criminalized, hindered, interfered with, or prevented from exercising their rights to protect the sanctity of their rights to free and fair elections.

(2) Existing election laws will be enforced. Election fraudsters will be cited.

(3) Chief State election officials may campaign in any elections, including federal elections, or take an active part in political management or in a political campaign with respect to any election for Federal office as is their protected civil right.

(4) Government officials, candidates for election, and news media will be subject to fine, lawsuit, and prosecution for slander or libel for knowingly publicizing false information about elections, carrying with it a sentence of up to five years.

(5) “Campus Vote Coordinators” will not be funded or allowed at higher institutions of learning. Institutions of higher learning will not be incentivized via grants or other remuneration to indoctrinate students or register them to vote.

(6) Prohibit any jurisdiction from administering an election by utilizing curbside voting as a method by which individuals may cast ballots in an election.

(7) No federal mandates for new disclosures for corporations are allowed to restrict corporate participation in elections if these mandates violate free speech rights.

(8) The US Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United is allowed to stand as written.

(9) No politician is allowed to use campaign funds and donations for personal use or personal expenses such as childcare.

(10) Businesspersons will not be discouraged from running for office by forcing them to divest their financial interests or to make their tax returns public.

(C) Authority

(1) The Secretary of State is not allowed to have any capacity or authority to override a clerk or to adjudicate ballots in bulk.

(2) A system of checks and balances will be put in place to ensure the Secretary of State and government officials cannot overstep their respective roles.

(D) REJECT HB 4191. Election of intermediate school boards: Intermediate school boards will continue to consist of five (5) members as elected by their constituent boards of education in the intermediate school district.

(E) SUPPORT SB 0280 and HB4200. Initiative signatures will be verified in a timely manner.

Subject to the 100-day deadline in subsection (1) the bureau of elections will review initiative petition signatures and the board of state canvassers will complete the canvass of the initiative petition within 90 days after the initiative petition is filed with the secretary of state. If an initiative petition is filed with the secretary of state 45 days or fewer before a November election, the bureau of elections will review the initiative petition signatures and the board of state canvassers will complete the canvass of the initiative petition within 120 days after the initiative petition is filed with the secretary of state.

     The board of state canvassers will complete the canvass of an initiative petition within 100 days after the petition is filed with the secretary of state. If the board of state canvassers declares that an initiative petition is sufficient, the initiative petition will be immediately forwarded to the legislature for consideration (Johnson).

(F) LEGISLATE. It is urgently necessary for states to pass laws barring action civics and Critical Race Theory from the K-12 curriculum and teacher training. (“Get set for dangerous Critical Race Theory in every school in America,” New York Post, Apr. 23, 2021.)

   

%d bloggers like this: